Reversing Arthritis

Is arthritis a natural consequence of ageing that will happen to everyone?

Is it normal that my joints will ache later because I played sport as a youngster?

No No No!

There are a lot of myths around arthritis that are simply not true.

knee OA

Firstly let’s quickly define what we are referring to here.

Did you know there are over 100 medical conditions that fall under the label “arthritis”! In this article we will be referring to the most common which osteoarthritis a “wear and tear” disease associated with degeneration of the cartilage.

The most common symptoms are pain, aching, redness, swelling and loss of function. It can be a chronic dull ache or can be felt as sharp pain that comes and goes. Some people may be aware of stiffness in the joints in the mornings. Others feel clicking, grating and grinding in the joints.

It is a myth that this type of arthritis is some nasty disease that will progressively get worse. In fact- if you are aware of it early- you may be able to reverse it. If you leave it though- it generally does worsen- as you have not changed or improved anything.

What can physio treatment do to help?

Very often the joint is wearing out due to tightness in the surrounding muscles, poor biomechanics, weakness in the muscles around it, bad alignment- think about a car tyre that is poorly aligned- one part of it will wear out more quickly.

The physio will assess the state of the joint, muscle, ligament and nerves (if relevant) and see what is at fault. They will treat the area- perhaps restoring normal joint movement, addressing any knots or tightness in the muscle, showing you some stretching exercise – if relevant or strengthening exercises – if relevant.

We have seen many, many patients avoid operations for joint replacements after getting correct physio treatment.

Also there are many recent studies that demonstrate patients knee arthritis IMPROVE after commencing a cycling programme.

fingers

The worst thing you can do is nothing.

If you suspect the worst- do not bury your head on the sand- come in, we will take a look and work with you to design a programme that will either prevent the problem getting worse or ideally improve and reverse it- and YES this does happen :)

 

 

 

Painkillers will give temporary relief but will not correct the underlying issue- resulting in worsening of the condition over time.

 

Book Now

Hello@bodyinmotion.co.uk

01202 720 300

The Myth of Having a Tight Core

One of the most deafening messages we have all been given at the gyms and all the health/fitness magazines we read is to tighten the core.

Is this really the goal?

We when speak of the core, we are speaking about one of the strongest muscles in the body.

Tight core

 

 

 

 

As physios we often see patients who are “tight”, we often see patients who have “strength” but if they are not able to control this tightness or strength at the right time, the strength is rendered useless.

A tight core can lessen our performance or even worse- result in injuries. What you need to move well is a well coordinated core.

Functional strength in the core is not achieved through holding it tight but through using ourselves in more efficient ways. We need to train functionally, with good form and technique in multi directions.

tight abs

 

 

 

 

 

 

When you have had pain at some point say for example in the back, many of the deeper postural muscles become inhibited. If someone then reads in a magazine “get tight abds to reduce back pain” they will inevitably commence doing hundreds of sit ups- which will give them tighter abds- but still no control and will make the back pain worse!

If you are a frustrated athlete- who feels strong and fit but continually gets injured- speak to one of us. There may be a slight weakness or imbalance that you have overlooked that can be easily remedied….

 

Hello@bodyinmotion.co.uk

01202 720 300

 

When you should worry about back pain…

Back pain is widespread throughout our communities and is much higher in sedentary populations.
Luckily, most back pain tends to resolve itself within 7-10 days.
However if it has not gone away by itself, it can usually be treated quickly and effectively with a few physio sessions.

BackPainSitting

When to worry:

Please note: There are a few rare causes of back pain that need to be dealt with immediately such as cancer, or spinal cord injury.

If you have had an accident that had forces so great, you “could have” fractured your spine- get it checked out-Xray’d.

AP XRAY

If you have incontinence (bladder or bowel) or numbness around the “saddle”/groin area, please get this checked out immediately.

However, in most cases of back pain that become chronic, the pain is not life threatening, but it can “suck the joy out of your life”.

It also can stop you participating in activities you like such as sport or parties as you just don’t feel like it. Once it starts affecting your sleep, that’s when you start to get really grumpy!
When to see a physio:
• You have had it longer than 2 weeks
• It is not improving or actually getting worse
• You have tingling/referred pain in the arms or legs
• You have noticed weakness in the muscles of the arms or legs
• You feel generally unwell
• Difficulty urinating, loss of continence or numbness in the groin area.

The physio will screen you and ascertain whether the back pain is something you need to be racing to A and E for or whether it is appropriate for physio.

Book physio 

In many cases, the pain will be caused by muscle spasm, trigger points (which can refer pain to other parts of the body), muscle imbalance, stiff intervertebral facet joints, pinched nerve or unhealthy spinal discs. The physio will treat the area, give you some important postural advice, exercises if required to help reduce your stiffness or strengthen a weakness.

By the way, did you know sitting is as bad for you as smoking? Even if we do exercise afterwards, the effects are not easily reversed. When sitting too long, muscle cells stop producing health sustaining regulatory chemicals required for normal biological functions. There has been much research into this linking inactivity to cancer, diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

So throughout the day, make sure you move! Supplement this movement with regular exercise- boot camp, yoga, kettle bells, PT.

Any niggles or aches that have not gone away by themselves in 2 weeks-, come and see us before an easy acute problem, becomes chronic!

 

Book physio session

 

 

5 Reasons To Have Sports Massage

Hi all, my name is Peter Thompson and here are my latest thoughts on sports massage:

Peter 1

All those posters at the gym of people holding their backs and pulling funny faces, the articles in running magazines or even hearing about how Mo Farah wouldn’t be without his ‘daily massage’ all suggest there might just be something behind the so called ‘power of massage’ but they can’t all be wrong can they?

 

sports massage 56

 

Well I guess I’m not likely to be the person to say ‘yes’ to that question but that doesn’t mean that I can’t try and explain why.
As a sports and remedial therapist, I see many clients ranging from elite athletes looking to find marginal gains in their sports to office workers whose bad back keeps them up all night. Regardless of their reasons for seeing me and using massage they are doing so because it works for them. They see results and wouldn’t be without their weekly fix.
So could it work for you?

20% of your first visit with Peter

People often overlook the benefits of massage as a permanent fixture in their training or rehabilitation plans. I believe the benefits of sport and remedial massage are vastly overlooked as a preventative cure as opposed to just a quick fix. In a sporting context, I understand that if you have regular massage and never get injured that you will never completely know what part the massage had in that but I certainly don’t see it as being a case of the emperor’s new clothes.

hilary

There are many proven reasons as to its success and here are my top 5:

• Speeds up recovery – Massage helps to break down scar tissue and adhesions as well as removing muscle waste and restoring nutrition to tired or injured muscles.

• Prevents injury – By aiding recovery between sessions it means muscles are able to function properly and therefore are less likely to get injured. Also by identifying potential problems, it means they are less likely to escalate and be damaged further.

• Improves self awareness – Massage can help to identify problems in areas and in doing so, show you what areas you need to work on. It is a much better use of time to spend 1 hr a week identifying and preventing problems than 40 hours a week for 6 weeks trying to fix them.

20% of your first visit with Peter

 

• Improves flexibility – Massage can improve flexibility through a variety of stretches or exercises that I may advise. Massage alone also stretches muscle tissue and has a similar effect on the muscular sheath and surrounding fascia, allowing stored tension and pressure to be realised.

• Enhances performance – Massage can help people to improve performance within their chosen sports or in everyday life. This can be seen through any or all of the above but also in allowing muscles to work effectively as possible and grab those marginal gains needed to be at your best

I am so convinced this will work for you that for a limited time I am currently offering 20% off your first appointment so you can find out first hand whether it works for you.

 

 Email Peter to book or call us on 01202 720300

 

I’ll leave you with a recent testimonial:

“I have been having treatments from Peter Thompson since September 2013. This has ranged from general day to day massages, to keep me running during high mileage marathon training, to niggles I have picked up along the way. Pete has worked on tight calfs, IT band and other slight pulls and strains I have had.

Over the last 9 months I have found Peter very knowledgeable and helpful. He is very thorough in his massages and I believe he has helped me achieve 2 PB’s in my last 2 marathons. These being 2hrs 46mins at the Abingdon marathon and 2hrs 43mins at this years London marathon. I know I put the miles in but could not have done it without Pete’s help, as he enabled me to train hard injury free.

Graeme Miller – Sub 2 hour 45 mins marathon runner”

Peter Thompson
Sports and remedial therapist – ISRM CNHC

Knee pain=User error!

Knee pain- what a mysterious thing it is…has anyone ever been the doctor to discuss knee pain that is not going away to be told “it’s your age”.
What?
This is impossible- I am only 23 years old!
Frighteningly, many of our patients have had the same experience people in their 20s and 30s and are told their knee pain is due to “wear and tear” and “what can you expect at your age?”

Well lucky for our patients at Body in Motion, we do not share the same view!
In fact as Kelly Starrett points out in his book, Becoming a Supple Leopard, our tissues are designed to last roughly 110 years.

And further, that 1% of musculoskeletal dysfunction and pain is due to pathology (cancer, and serious disease), 1% due to catastrophic injury- (like a bad tackle or a car accident) which leaves the other 98% (yes 98%!!!) due to poor alignment, muscle imbalance and dysfunction. (yes that means it is our fault- ie user error!).

The flip side of this though is that it means that once we understand what to do, we can also fix the problem.

Remember IF you are moving correctly, your knees will never bother you.

One service we offer is gait analysis which observes how your knee moves during walking or running and from there we can identify which muscles are too weak, which muscles are too tight, where your alignment could be improved and so on….

This is extremely valuable and cannot be learned in a book or by watching a youtube video.

No matter what you have been told in the past, you do not have knee pain due to your age (even if you are 70!), your genes or a random excuse like “but I just stood up from a chair and my knee went!”

Correct stance is imperative- vertical knee alignment without sagging knees collapsing or being bow legged.

Next assess your foot position.

The foot is a lever; it is designed to point forward. In this position, the stress on your plantar fascia is minimised, the toes articulate correctly and the ankle can move with least friction.

footflatfoot04

 

 

 

 
Most people stand habitually with collapsed arches and externally rotated feet.
Practice several times a day standing with your feet pointing forwards, do some calf stretches, most people are extremely tight through the calves which pulls your foot and leg into external rotation.

Also range of motion at the ankle joint is very important because if it stiff, it will send excess force further up the kinetic chain, ie the knee!

Also important to the health of the knee is the strength and mobility of the hip.

We are a nation of chronic sitters. Joints that stay in the one position for long periods of time gradually stay like that. Most of us have extremely tight hip flexors and very weak gluteal muscles.

Flat Butt

Flat Butt

Both of these factors place enormous amounts of strain on the knee making it compensate and move in ways it should not. The biomechanics behind this is very complex but to simplify it- all we have to know is that the stronger our gluteal muscles are, the less knee pain we will have.

Add some hip flexor stretches into your weekly programme, do some gluteal strengthening work each week, practice walking barefoot- preferably on the grass or the sand or around the house, using your full range of foot motion.

hip-flexor-stretch

When you feel like your body has failed you… just think for a minute if it is really the other way around?

 

It might be that we have failed our knees by not looking after them and not listening to the odd twinge that over time becomes more regular…!

 

Get assessed by a sports physiotherapist, get the right exercises that actually work, not just a bunch of generic programmes from the internet.

Book now: 01202 720 300

hello@bodyinmotion.co.uk

By the way on the subject of looking after our bodies, are your shoulders back and down? Like right now? Don’t pretend that you were not slouching while you’re reading this…

 

How to Run

 

Running is a non contact sport and seemingly one of the most natural things we should be able to do as human beings- right? We have spent thousands of years running away from danger and running to collect or catch food. Why then is it one of the sports that has one of the highest incidence of injury?

The answer, my friends is biomechanics!

It is the “way” we run that is so bad for us…..Many of us ran all the time as kids or ran cross country for school or joined the local athletic team with no injury.

correct gait
Most people’s story goes something like this:
“I was really fit and sporty as a youngster then around the age of 15 years old I found boys, girls, parties, alcohol, motorbikes, jobs whatever distraction took my fancy and more or less gave up exercise during my twenties- well, except for a Saturday night disco- does that count?

One day I looked in the mirror in my thirties and was horrified at what I saw- middle age spread starting to occur, a little hunch starting to form due to lap top use and no exercise, stiff, unfit and drifting towards old age rather quickly! So I decided to get back to my running. I got myself back to 5 km, when I noticed pain in my shins…. I rested for a week, then went back out there, shin pain occurred again, I rested for 3 weeks, I thought it had gone- but as soon as I started again it was back….I don’t want to give it up now that I have finally started again- what should I do?”

This story is very familiar of many of our clients- substitute knee pain, hip pain, plantar fasciitis or any other pain.
When we stop exercise for a while, our core muscles get weak, our hamstrings and calves tighten and our natural way of running is compromised. We start to run on stiff, brittle, weak legs on a weak, saggy tummy with weak, saggy gluteal muscles.

NOT a good recipe for success!
Runners need to be taught how to run again. There is no shame in this by the way- every sport requires coaching: Usain Bolt, and Mo Farrah both have biomechanic coaches as well as strength and conditioning coaches to make sure they are running efficiently and not placing any undue stress on any part of the body which may lead to injury.

knee flexion
If you want to swim well or play golf well, you take lessons- the same applies to running. Gait analysis is one of the best tools to identify your specific weakness- see where you need to strengthen, where you need to improve your flexibility and just to get an idea of what to think about when you run to continue to improve and make it more and more effortless.

Gait analysis is where we video you running on the treadmill then analyse it back in slow motion. We can identify what is going wrong and where you can improve to increase your speed and prevent injury.
This will help you run injury free, improve efficiency, reduce post run soreness.

 

Special Offer on gait analysis this week only :£10 off.

Hello@bodyinmotion.co.uk

01202 720 300

How to Run

How to Run

Running is a non contact sport and seemingly one of the most natural things we should be able to do as human beings- right? We have spent thousands of years running away from danger and running to collect or catch food. Why then is it one of the sports that has one of the highest incidence of injury?

The answer, my friends is biomechanics!

It is the “way” we run that is so bad for us…..Many of us ran all the time as kids or ran cross country for school or joined the local athletic team with no injury.

correct gait
Most people’s story goes something like this:
“I was really fit and sporty as a youngster then around the age of 15 years old I found boys, girls, parties, alcohol, motorbikes, jobs whatever distraction took my fancy and more or less gave up exercise during my twenties- well, except for a Saturday night disco- does that count?

One day I looked in the mirror in my thirties and was horrified at what I saw- middle age spread starting to occur, a little hunch starting to form due to lap top use and no exercise, stiff, unfit and drifting towards old age rather quickly! So I decided to get back to my running. I got myself back to 5 km, when I noticed pain in my shins…. I rested for a week, then went back out there, shin pain occurred again, I rested for 3 weeks, I thought it had gone- but as soon as I started again it was back….I don’t want to give it up now that I have finally started again- what should I do?”

This story is very familiar of many of our clients- substitute knee pain, hip pain, plantar fasciitis or any other pain.
When we stop exercise for a while, our core muscles get weak, our hamstrings and calves tighten and our natural way of running is compromised. We start to run on stiff, brittle, weak legs on a weak, saggy tummy with weak, saggy gluteal muscles.

NOT a good recipe for success!
Runners need to be taught how to run again. There is no shame in this by the way- every sport requires coaching: Usain Bolt, and Mo Farrah both have biomechanic coaches as well as strength and conditioning coaches to make sure they are running efficiently and not placing any undue stress on any part of the body which may lead to injury.

knee flexion
If you want to swim well or play golf well, you take lessons- the same applies to running. Gait analysis is one of the best tools to identify your specific weakness- see where you need to strengthen, where you need to improve your flexibility and just to get an idea of what to think about when you run to continue to improve and make it more and more effortless.

Gait analysis is where we video you running on the treadmill then analyse it back in slow motion. We can identify what is going wrong and where you can improve to increase your speed and prevent injury.
This will help you run injury free, improve efficiency, reduce post run soreness.

 

Special Offer on gait analysis this week only :£10 off.

Hello@bodyinmotion.co.uk

01202 720 300

Sports Massage- The best secret weapon

The best “secret” weapon against pain.

(keep reading to bottom for testimonials)
Muscle knots — myofascial “trigger points” — are a factor in most people’s aches and pains. Their biology is still not well understood.

But they can cause strong unrelenting pain at the site and that sometimes refer to other parts of the body.
Deep tissue/trigger point massage is surprisingly helpful at “de activating” the trigger point and is remarkably effective at reducing the pain.

trapezius_4c
Probably because of trigger points, simple self-massage is helpful for a surprising number of common pain problems. Even when trigger points are not the root cause of your problem, they may be aggravating it and producing some of the pain.

One can self massage these points if you can reach them. But often reaching them is the problem and getting the right angle so you can apply enough pressure to be effective.
I am sure some of you are familiar with the dreaded foam roller or the tennis ball in the back!
Obviously good sports physiotherapists and good massage therapists can find these spots quickly and easily which is why some people say they have “magic hands”.

self-back-massage-3

 

Prevention: important even after you’ve been hurt
A major part of healing is prevention: that is, the prevention of re-injury, and so “prevention” is actually relevant even after you’ve already gotten into trouble. Also, injury and pain problems tend to make people accident prone. When one ankle is sprained, it’s easier to trip and sprain the other one. It is also common to get compensation pain ie you walk differently with a sprained ankle which then gives you pain in your hip or your back. This is called “collateral injury,” and is amazingly common. Other muscles have to work harder to compensate for the injured part, then can then develop trigger points or scar tissue depending on how long this altered movement pattern goes on for.

Call us or email us if you have any questions or would like to book an appointment

 

Deep tissue massage works!

Here are some massage testimonials:

“At the beginning of November, I suffered a huge and painful injury on my left calf muscle during a hockey match which led me to resort to crutches and NHS physio.

Despite exercises, after 10 weeks my muscle was still weak and I was still unable to run or even jog on it as it tightened up and caused great pain. With all my hopes and confidence shattered, I decided to ask Body in Motion if they could help.

From day one, they were both professional and welcoming, they identified the problem  and did a deep sports massage to get rid of the scar tissue. Each week, the pain decreased and my muscle grew stronger and stronger alongside carrying out the suggested exercises at home.

I was incredibly impressed, I am now back on the hockey pitch, enjoying regular games. I have already recommended  a friend who came and was also impressed by their sports massage skills. I would not hesitate in returning to Body in Motion if I ever suffered another injury”

Kate

 

“I consulted Body in Motion over a knee pain sustained while on holiday in Bournemouth. The sports massage treatment resulted in immediate improvement to the injury and a feeling of great relief as well as a sense of being in safe hands.

I would recommend this to anyone in need of treatment in this area, or indeed any other type of muscle injury. Further more I continue to travel to Bournemouth from London once a month for sports massage as I find it so beneficial”

Philipp G, London

 

 

“This is just to say that, following a brilliant remedial massage with you on Wednesday, I went back to the gym  yesterday for the first time in seven weeks. I am so thrilled and relieved to be getting back to my fitness regime after such a tedious time with  back pain and sciatica and I want to thank you so much for the treatment, advice and no-nonsense positivity I received at your hands. After back pain for 7 weeks, you fixed it in just 30 mins. I can see an end to my injury and I’m so grateful.

I will be making another appointment with you within the next week or so, and I am so pleased I found you; I only wish I’d found you sooner!

Thank you”

Sam

 

Call us or email us if you have any questions or would like to book an appointment

 

Hip flexor strain: Marathon training

Training for London marathon is in full swing, with runners ramping up their mileage and starting to notice that the niggles are no longer going away with a day of rest.

We also have some runners entering Barcelona, Paris and Brighton marathons around the same time.

Most of you know the importance of having regular sports massage to maintain good leg elasticity, prevent injury and improve your training performance.
Today I thought we would highlight the hip flexors which are not much talked about.

hip-flexor-injury
They are a big muscle group though and if they start to misbehave, it can take a long time to heal.

So watch out for these ones…

Where are they?

The hip flexors are the group of muscles located in the front of your hip which lift the leg off the ground.
They begin in your back and connect into the femur (thigh bone). Although injuries to these muscles are rare, in the normal population, it is amazing how suddenly increasing your weekly mileage can give you pains in muscles that you never knew you had!

When training for a marathon it is SO important to listen to your body and get any niggles sorted out right away. With marathon training there is very little “flex” built into people’s schedules for weeks off with injury, so best to have a couple of days rest and a sports massage to loosen up everything than try to “run through the pain” and end up needing 6 weeks off!

Symptoms

Inflammation

• Pain or dull ache in the groin when you lift your knee up to your chest (particularly when there’s resistance)
• Tightness in the groin

• Swelling in the groin

• The pain may disappear during your training but feel worse afterwards.

The best way to treat inflammation is to rest until the pain has gone. Applying heat/ice to the area will also help.

Sports massage to the hip flexors will increase circulation to the area, increase elasticity, remove accumulated toxins and release any tightness in the muscle.

Rupture

Here are some of the common symptoms of ruptured hip flexors:
• A sudden, sharp pain in the groin.
• Weakness in the area.
• Pain in the groin when you lift your knee up to your chest (particularly when there’s resistance).

If you think you may have ruptured your hip flexors, you should rest immediately. Applying ice and pressure to the area.

See your doctor or sports physio to get a correct diagnosis and a correct prognosis of how long it will take to get better. It is possible to do a partial rupture or a full tear.
You may need crutches, and during your recovery the muscle will need gradual mobilisation and strengthening to avoid it tightening up. If the muscle does become tight, there’s a risk it will rupture again.

hip_flexor_lift
Although it’s rare, if the muscle tears completely it would require surgery. Again, get it correctly diagnosed in the beginning when you have a small pain, do not wait for a major problem before you seek help.

Other conditions

Pain in the groin area is common but it’s sometimes difficult to locate the source of it. Here are some other conditions that are often mistaken for injury to the hip flexors:
• Inflammation or rupture of the adductor muscles (the muscles which begin in the pelvic bone and connect into the femur).
• A inguinal hernia.
• Trapped nerve
• Prostatitis (inflammation of the prostate gland).

 Any hip or groin pain please call us 01202 720 300 or Email Us

 

Never let shin splints stop you

Medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS) commonly known as shin splints, refers to pain in the shin area. The muscles that attach to the tibia become inflamed if the stress continues the tibia may in severe cases develop small micro fractures.

shin-splints

Shin splints are fairly common but must be treated immediately and with care. If prolonged pain persists or you try to run through the pain, you may require 1 year off sport to completely allow the bony fractures to heal.

What causes shin splints?

They can be brought on by strenuous activities such as squash, tennis or basketball. Unaccustomed running on hard surfaces is also a common cause of shin splints.
The most common cause we see frequently in the clinic is poor bio-mechanics causing torsional forces in the leg when the runner lands- there is a twist in the leg which done repeatedly causes inflammation in the shin.

Pain may be felt in first few miles of the run and then it may wear off and get worse later.

People with flat feet or rigid arches have a higher risk of developing shin splints. Running on slanted surfaces or uneven terrain may predispose someone to shin splints. Also sports that include bursts of speed and sudden stops may exacerbate shin splints

What are the signs and symptoms of shin splints?

Patient experiences a dull pain in the front part of the lower leg.

• Dull pain on either side of shin bone or in muscle itself
• Moderate swelling in the lower leg
• Feet may feel numb and weak, because the swollen muscles irritate the nerves to the feet

How are shin splints diagnosed?

We will make a diagnosis based on a structured clinical assessment . It depends upon a careful review of your medical/lifestyle history and a focused physical exam (an exam focused on the shins and legs where local tenderness is noted). We will also look at your bio-mechanics and gait (walking/ running) pattern to understand the reason for your problem.

SafeRange
In some situations specific radiological tests, such as x-rays, bone scans or MRI scans, can be helpful to exclude stress fracture and other underlying injury of the tibia bone. These will help us to guide you back to activity in the safest and quickest way.

How do we treat shin splints?

Where possible, we try to utilise a “relative rest” approach and aim to keep people as active as possible whilst avoiding any aggravation of the problem. We prefer a ‘hands-on’ approach where suitable. Sometimes a set period of complete rest is required to prevent further damage and allow healing to take place.

shinsplints treatjpg

Our approach often includes:

• Specific exercise programmes to allow maintenance of cardiovascular fitness, whilst your injury is treated and heals.
• Specific massage and soft tissue treatments.
• Footwear and bio-mechanics analysis.
• Stretching techniques.
• Graded strengthening exercises to rehabilitate the injury, correct any bio-mechanical faults and improve your fitness.
• Advice on orthotic insoles if appropriate

If your gait is at fault this MUST be corrected or the problem will continue to re occur.
This approach is tailored to your specific problem and individual needs and we will work with you through to full recovery.

Run-Biomechanics-comp

 

Self management of shin splints

1) Decrease Your Activity
Expect that you need at least 2 to 4 weeks of rest from your sport or exercise.
2) Avoid repetitive exercise of your lower leg for 1 to 2 weeks. Keep your activity to just the walking that you do during your regular day.
3) Try other low impact activities as long as you don’t have pain, such as swimming or biking.
After 2 to 4 weeks, if the pain is gone, you can start your usual activities. Increase your activity level slowly. If the pain returns, stop exercising right away.
Know that shin splints can take 3 to 6 months to heal. Do not rush back into your sport or exercise. You could injure yourself again.
4) Reduce Your Pain and Swelling
Ice your shins. Ice several times a day for 3 days or until pain is gone.
Ask your physiotherapist about correct and relevant stretching exercises. Use arch supports.

Talk with your physiotherapist about wearing the proper shoes, and about special shock-absorbing insoles or orthotics to wear inside your shoes.

5) Work with your physiotherapist on correctly strengthening any muscle imbalances/weaknesses you may have or poor gait patterns.

• Be pain-free for at least 2 weeks before returning to your exercise routine.
• Do not overdo your exercise routine. Do not return to your previous level of intensity. Go slower, for a shorter time. Increase your training slowly.
• Warm up before exercise.
• Ice your shins after exercise to decrease swelling.
• Avoid hard surfaces.
• Wear proper shoes with good support.
• Cross train: add in low impact exercise such as swimming or biking.
Please do not ignore shin splints. If you cannot stop it from happening, please visit us as soon as possible for immediate and effective cure.

Call 01202 720 300

Email: hello@bodyinmotion.co.uk